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Old 04-20-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
Bull Bull is offline
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Default Weather station mast grounding

Hello Everyone,
I will be moving my wireless weather station to a mast setup on my roof. What type of grounding should I use? Should I run a number 10 along the roof down the side of the house to my electrical meter metal conduit? The run would be approximately 10'.

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Bull
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Old 04-22-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
leland leland is offline
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Grounding the weather station? or bonding the mast?

The ground should be the same size as the current carrying conductors powering the station..
The bond,to the mast. A #10 to the grounding electrode would be fine.
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Old 04-22-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Default Weather station mast ground

The weather station is wireless so your right in that I would only be grounding the mast.

Thanks
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Old 04-22-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Fact It is not necessary to ground the equipment of a wireless weather station.

How far above your roof's peak does your weather station's pole (mask) project? Is this a metal or PVC pole? Most wireless weather stations I've seen have plastic poles.
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Old 05-02-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Dale View Post
How far above your roof's peak does your weather station's pole (mask) project? Is this a metal or PVC pole? Most wireless weather stations I've seen have plastic poles.

Steve,
The mast pole is made of metal and extends approximately 7' above the roof peak. I thought I had to ground the mast pole to the outside of the electrical meter. If you think I should ground the mast is a #6 or #10 adequate?

Thanks,
Bull
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Old 05-09-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Bull,

As Steve said it's not required. If your not connecting any wire to your equipment that would travel from outside into the structure, then there is no need to ground the mast or any other parts. Just because it's called a "mast" doesn't mean that your using it as such, in an electrical current path type scenario.

Jim
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Old 05-14-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Fact

Click on the map for a Lightning Risk Evaluation of your Home (provided by IPC)





Below are some common questions in evaluating your home's lighting strike risk.

My home has had previous lightning damage.

My home is located in an isolated open area.

My home is located on top of a hill or prominent area.

My home has tall trees overhanging or standing nearby.

My home has a metal wood burning chimney.

My home has a brick or stone chimney.

My home has a metal ridge vent

My home has aluminum siding.

My home has structural steel support beams inside.

My home does not have secondary lightning surge arresters on electric panel.

My home does not have surge protection on incoming phone line.

My home has a computer, TV, security system or other electronic appliances.

My home is located in the United States with over 30 thunderstorm days per year.

My home is located in an area where neighbors have had lightning damage.


Here are related links:

http://www.lightning.org

http://www.lightningsafety.com

http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/Ab...ookie%5Ftest=1

http://www.strikestarus.com

http://gcmd.nasa.gov/records/GCMD_NLDN.html

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=6679
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Old 05-14-2009 - Weather station mast grounding - Grounding, Bonding, and Protection - Voltage Talk forum
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Opinion Are you referring to grounding for static charge rather than ground-fault current?

The basic principle behind lightning is charge separation. This means a "pool" of positively charged particles becomes separated from a pool of negatively charged particles. A charge potential naturally develops when such a separation occurs. Since air is an insulator (meaning it does not conduct the flow of electrons well), the potential required for electricity to move through it is very high. If a discharge does occur between the two pools, it is called lightning. Static electricity is built up during a thunderstorm with wind blowing over metal structures. This static charge can potentially become an attractor to the opposite charge of static build up in storm clouds. Even though direct and secondary static electricity (lightning) strike probability increased by a buildup of static charge at points of conductivity such as a metal mast or poles. By properly grounding the mask (see related NFPA reference below) you are essentially draining off the static charge continuously thus reducing the probability of a lightning strike because the potential difference is reduced. I think a small 7" metal pole/mask would have minimal if any buildup effect, however it won't hurt to install a grounding conductor to the electrical meter housing or equivalent. However, grounding something will NOT protect you if you take a direct or even a secondary hit, having the metal mask/pole or an antenna grounded or not won't matter because it won't drain a 50 billion volt lightning bolt where the spark diameter may be as big as a foot across with multiple branches that may encase your whole house for 2-3 seconds. The NEC recommends 10 AWG copper for grounding masks/poles on receiving supporting receiving equipment.

The idea behind providing proper structure grounding is to reduce the probability of getting hit in the first place and to protect your electrical equipment by continuously bleeding off small static charge buildup.

Related NFPA Standards, Articles and Sections:

NEC Section 250.4 General Requirements for Grounding and Bonding.

NEC Section 810.15 Grounding. Mast and metal structures supporting antennas shall be grounded in accordance 810.21.

NEC Section 810.21 Grounding Conductors - Receiving Stations.

NEC Section 810.21...(B) Run in Straight Line. The grounding conductor for an antenna mast or antenna discharge unit shall be run in as straight a line as practicable from the mask or discharge unit to the grounding electrode.

NEC Section 810.21...(F) Electrode. The grounding conductor shall be connected are required in (F)(1) through (F)(3)

NEC Section 810.21(F)...(3) The power service accessible means external to the building, as covered in 250.94 (4) The metallic power service raceway (5) The service equipment enclosure...

NEC Section 810.58 Grounding Conductors - Amateur Transmitting and Receiving Stations. Grounding conductors shall comply with 810.58(A) through (C)... (C) Size of Protective Grounding Conductor. ...10 AWG copper, bronze, or copper-clad steel.

NFPA 780 Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems.
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